Periodontics Frequiently asked Questions

Who is a Periodontist?

A periodontist is a dental specialist who has the training and experience required by the American Dental Association to diagnose, treat, and prevent various forms of periodontal/gum disease.

What Is Periodontal Disease?

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, often begins as a buildup of plaque on the surface of the tooth near the gum line. If this plaque is not removed by brushing and flossing regularly, it can harden into what your dentist calls tartar.

Plaque will continue to build up over the tartar, and eventually cause the gums to become red, swollen, and irritated. This is known as gingivitis and is the first stage of periodontal disease. If left untreated, gingivitis can turn into periodontal disease.

What are the common signs and symptoms of periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is often silent, meaning symptoms- particularly pain- may not appear until an advanced stage of the disease. However, you should still be on the lookout for the signs and symptoms, which include:

  • Red, swollen or tender gums or other pain in your mouth
  • Bleeding while brushing, flossing, or when eating certain foods
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth, causing the teeth to look longer than before
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Sores in your mouth
  • Persistent bad breath
  • A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • A change in the fit of partial dentures
Is Periodontal Disease Treatable?

Gum disease is both preventable and treatable. Today’s periodontal treatments offer a variety of options that are gentle, safe, and effective. If you have been diagnosed with gingivitis or gum disease, our office can help you determine which treatment best meets your needs. Periodontal treatments include:

  • Non-surgical treatment
  • Periodontal surgery
  • Periodontal therapy
  • Dental implants
  • At-home care (special toothpaste, mouthwash, toothbrushes, and prescription treatment trays)
Am I At Risk Of Having Periodontal Disease?

You may be at risk of having periodontal disease if you smoke or use tobacco products, do not brush your teeth and floss regularly, have health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, or osteoporosis, or several of your family members have had gum disease since it can, in some cases, be genetic. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of gum disease, schedule an appointment with your dentist, who can determine whether treatment is necessary.

Will My Insurance Cover My Periodontal Treatment?

Many insurance plans will provide assistance for periodontal treatment. Our practice understands how important your dental health is, and we want you to get the most out of any dental treatment you receive. We will help you work with your insurance provider to make sure your treatment is easy on your budget, and your peace of mind.

Is periodontal disease contagious?

Research has shown that periodontal disease is caused by the inflammatory reaction to bacteria under the gums, so periodontal disease technically may not be contagious. However, the bacteria that cause the inflammatory reaction can be spread through saliva. This means that if one of your family members has periodontal disease, it’s a good idea to avoid contact with their saliva by not sharing eating utensils or oral health equipment. If you notice that your spouse or a family member has the warning signs of a possible periodontal problem (bleeding, red and swollen gums, or bad breath) you may want to suggest that they see the periodontist for an exam. It may help to protect the oral health of everyone in the family.

What are the consequences of missing teeth?

There are actually several negative consequences of missing some or all of your teeth. First, missing teeth will affect the aesthetics of your face. Not only will your smile be affected by the gaps from missing teeth, but if you’re missing too many teeth, the skin around your mouth won’t be supported properly and will start to sag, making you appear older than you are. Additionally, missing teeth will make it more difficult to chew your food properly and may even affect the way you speak. Finally, missing even one tooth may have emotional consequences; many people feel less confident about their smile when they are missing teeth. If you are currently missing any of your teeth, consider replacing them with dental implants, which can look and feel just like natural teeth.

I have big gums and short teeth, is there a way to improve my smile?

Yes, there may be a way to enhance your smile. It’s a good idea to discuss your options with a periodontist first. He or she can explain the best way to create the smile you want, as well as answer any questions that you may have. For example, one procedure that can remove excess gum tissue is called crown lengthening. After the excess gum tissue is removed, the gum line is then reshaped in order to create the right proportion between the gum tissue and tooth surface. Your general dentist and periodontist may also work together to coordinate additional treatments such as veneers or crowns. However, your periodontist and general dentist will recommend the best procedure to improve your smile.

What are dental implants?

A dental implant by itself is not a tooth! A dental implant is a prosthesis used to replace missing teeth. Essentially, it is a small titanium post/fixture that is inserted into the jawbone, on top of which a single crown (cap), a fixed bridge, a partial denture, or full denture can be attached. Once the implant integrates to your bone, a structure called an abutment is connected to the implant and then the artificial tooth/teeth are attached. Therefore, there are 3 parts to an “implant tooth”: the dental implant itself, the abutment, and the artificial tooth.

Who is a good candidate for dental implants?

Almost anyone who is missing a single tooth, multiple teeth, or all teeth are candidates for dental implants.

What are the advantages of dental implants?

Humans are “blessed” with 2 sets of teeth (baby teeth and adult/permanent teeth). When a single permanent tooth or multiple teeth are lost due to dental decay or gum disease, dental implants can now replace them as the 3rd set of fixed teeth! Dental implants can last a lifetime and can improve your appearance, your confidence, and your ability to eat the foods you like, and participate in an active lifestyle, without worrying about your teeth. Dental implants are made of titanium and can never get dental decay!

What is the success rate of dental implants?

It varies from individual to individual and with health and habits. For a healthy individual with good oral hygiene and good health, dental implants are predictably successful with reported success rates above 90-95 percent.

Do dental implants last?

Unlike natural teeth, dental implants are not susceptible to dental disease such as decay; however, the health of the gums is vital to maintaining lasting implant success. Conscientious home care by the patient and regular professional cleanings and check-ups are essential elements for dental implant sustainability. Each patient is different, and success relies upon diagnosis and planning, medical history, and a variety of other factors.

After periodontal disease diagnosis, How often should I see my periodontist?

Regular examinations are very important to keep track of the present status of your disease and any disease progression over time. Your periodontist will work with you to create a maintenance schedule depending on how advanced your periodontal disease is at that time. Based on many variable factors such as your overall health, the severity of bone loss, and risk factors such as smoking and genetics, your periodontist will constantly tailor your care so your periodontal disease does not progress further. He or she may recommend exams every six months for mild periodontal disease, or every few months for more advanced stages.

Is laser surgery for Periodontal disease a safe option?

There seem to be a lot of mixed messages when it comes to the use of lasers in periodontal treatment. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to suggest that any specific laser wavelength is superior to the traditional treatment methods for common periodontal diseases, such as periodontitis. Therefore, it is always in your best interest to talk with your individual periodontist about the particular laser or therapy he or she plans on using, and why he or she feels that it is the best course of treatment for your particular case.

Is there a connection between gum disease and heart disease?

The connection between gum disease and heart disease is a very hot topic in the field of periodontics right now! Several research studies have indicated that heart disease and gum disease may be linked, and researchers suspect that inflammation may be the basis for this relationship. If you are at risk for heart disease, it is a good idea to mention this to your periodontist, since gum disease may increase this risk.

Both of my parents have periodontal disease, is it genetic?

First of all, congratulations on being proactive about your health! Recent research has shown that genetics may be involved in a person’s risk for gum disease, but there are a variety of other factors that also play a role. The American Academy of Periodontology has an online risk assessment tool that you can use to determine your risk level for gum disease. The test only takes a few minutes to take, and you should discuss the results with your periodontist. Take the gum disease risk assessment test.

What can I do at home to prevent periodontal disease?

The best way to prevent periodontal disease is to take good care of your teeth and gums at home. This includes brushing your teeth after every meal and before bedtime, flossing at least once each day, and seeing your dentist or periodontist for regular exams twice a year. Spending a few minutes a day on preventative measures may save you the time and money of treating periodontal disease!

Other than diagnosing and treating gum disease, what else have periodontists been trained to do?

Most periodontists spend the majority of their time diagnosing and treating gum disease, but there are a variety of other procedures that they are able to perform. Periodontists place dental implants when natural teeth cannot be saved. They also monitor the implants to make sure that they’re properly doing their job. Periodontists may also correct gum recession and cover up exposed root surfaces which can be unsightly as well as sensitive to hot and cold. These procedures are often used to lay the foundation for additional cosmetic procedures to help create a beautiful smile. Finally, periodontists can be integral in the comprehensive planning of your oral care, along with your general dentist or other dental professionals.

Can children be at risk for developing periodontal disease?

Periodontal disease is rarely found in children, and only sometimes found in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to prevent periodontal disease in the future. Children should brush their teeth twice a day and learn how to floss properly- if children learn how to floss at an early age, they will be more likely to make it a lifetime habit. These two simple acts will help protect their teeth and gums from periodontal disease.

As a parent, you should also be aware of the warning signs of periodontal disease, which include red, swollen, bleeding gums or bad breath that won’t go away. If your child develops any of these symptoms, tell your dental professional right away. It’s also a good idea to ensure your dental professional knows your complete family history, as genetics can play an important role in the early development of periodontal disease.

What is Bone Grafting?

Bone grafting is a procedure where bone substitutes are placed next to the existing alveolar bone and the implant fixture, in order to promote new bone growth in these areas where the bone is needed. The bone substitutes, otherwise known as bone graft materials, can be synthetic, sterilized human donor bone, or derived from an animal source (commonly bovine). The bone graft is also usually covered by a collagen membrane, and stitches are placed over the grafted site. After a period of time (depending on the amount that is grafted as well as the type of graft used), new bone will be generated!

Although it sounds quite terrifying, the procedure is done under local anesthetic and has been described as being more comfortable than wisdom tooth surgery. After the grafting procedure, some mild discomfort and swelling are expected, but these are easily managed with some painkillers.

What Can I Expect from Implant Surgery and How Long Does It Take before My Implant is Done?

There are 4 methods of placing an implant, based on the timing of the procedure:

  1. Immediate placement – done at the same visit as tooth extraction
  2. Early placement – 4 to 8 weeks after tooth extraction
  3. Delayed placement – 12 to 16 weeks post-extraction
  4. Late placement – after more than 6 months